What's the deal with Intermittent Fasting - Coach Cathy Barry - Head Coach Eclipse T&F Club



I must profess that I've always been an "eat everything in moderation, don't eat processed foods and exercise" kind of advocate for weight loss. It goes without saying that if we eat healthy and exercise regularly and keep these two habits consistent we should be able to either maintain weight or even lose a few pounds.


So why can't we just stick to what is easy and good for us? Well, that's really a loaded question. We live in the "NOW" society of get me what I want, when I want it, and by the way, is there a pill for that? We aren't really interested in eating healthy all the time or even a little bit of the time. We prefer convenience above all else. We figure, tomorrow we'll start, and then the next day after that and then the week after that and so on. We've become really good at putting things off, Procrastination 101 (there really should be a degree in that). Other factors are socioeconomic, lack of education in regards to nutrition and also too much information on the world wide web that serves to confuse the population and led them to believe in some magical diets or fad diets.


I must profess that I've always been an "eat everything in moderation, don't eat processed foods and exercise" kind of advocate for weight loss. It goes without saying that if we eat healthily and exercise regularly and keep these two habits consistent we should be able to either maintain weight or even lose a few pounds.y findings.


So what is Intermittent Fasting:


According to John Hopkins Medicine: " Intermittent fasting is an eating plan that switches between fasting and eating on a regular schedule. Research shows that intermittent fasting is a way to manage your weight and prevent — or even reverse some forms of diseases."





How does this "fasting" and eating on a regular schedule work to help reduce or maintain weight?


According to the Harvard Medical School - Fasting is evolutionarily embedded within our physiology, triggering several essential cellular functions. Flipping the switch from a fed to fasting state does more than helping us burn calories and lose weight. The researchers combed through dozens of animal and human studies to explain how simple fasting improves metabolism, lowering blood sugar; lessens inflammation, which improves a range of health issues from arthritic pain to asthma; and even helps clear out toxins and damaged cells, which lowers risk for cancer and enhances brain function. - a process called "cellular glucose uptake"

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